Amie Street Closed

Online music marketplace Amie Street (amiestreet.com) closed today. Amie Street pages now redirect to amazon.com.

I’m sad to see Amie Street go. It was an interesting model for online music sales: all music began free and the price of each track rose according to its popularity. There was an active social network that allowed users to follow each other’s interests as well as artists and labels. And most importantly for me, anyone could upload music to sell on the site, which led to an interesting community of music lovers and music makers. (How often did I log on to discover the frighteningly prolific Crimson Razorback or Robert Waddington had posted yet another track?)

I had two recordings available on Amie Street: Maps and one 4 one. At the time Amie Street closed down, Maps was selling for a whopping $1.15 and one 4 one was currently at $0.45. Neither record earned enough royalties to warrant a check from Amie Street, but given a long enough tail I could imagine a dollar or two coming in every so often. Neither is currently available on amazon.com. For online distribution of my music, it looks like I’ll rely more and more on bandcamp.

When I heard the news that Amie Street would be closing I did a quick inventory of the music I purchased on the site: (in order, roughly, from most recent to least recent purchases)

  • Denseland
  • A Broken Consort
  • Prefuse 73
  • Charlie Barnet
  • Animal Collective
  • Grizzly Bear
  • Four Tet
  • 20 Minute Loop
  • Sunn 0)))
  • Kathryn Williams
  • Dirty Projectors
  • Sebadoh
  • Collections of Colonies of Bees
  • Faron Young
  • John Berndt
  • Katy Moffatt
  • Erik Friedlander
  • Lou Reed
  • Citymusic Cleveland
  • Nico Muhly
  • The Cave Singers
  • Matmos
  • Mouse on Mars
  • Michael Bullock
  • Clogs
  • Charlie Hunter (the banjo player)
  • Hem
  • Twelve 20 Six
  • The Be Good Tanyas
  • Cecil Taylor

And an untold number of other artists whose work I heard but didn’t keep around. It sounds cruel, but the point of a site like amie street is exactly this kind of exposure–which is likely what I’ll miss the most.

With Hidden Noises at Wired Kingdom

My installation With Hidden Noises is being presented as part of the Wired Kingdom exhibit at the Arts Center of the Capital Region. The exhibit will have a short, sweet run beginning Monday 9/20 and culminating with performances on Friday 9/24 as part of Troy Night Out.

With Hidden Noises is an interactive sound installation based on Marcel Duchamp’s sculpture of the same name. The original sculpture contains an unkown object placed inside by Duchamp’s patron and collector Walter Arensberg. The sculpture rattles when shaken, making it an early example of audio art. Unfortunately, the original is usually displayed in a vitrine and patrons aren’t allowed to activate it. Visitors to my installation can handle a replica of Duchamp’s readymade containing electronic sensors instead of an unkown object. Their interactions with the scultpture cause it to produce a variety of sounds related to Duchamp’s work. See some photosĀ here and check out the CD based on the installation.

Wired Kingdom features work by Patrick Dodson, Pete Edwards, Angela Washko, Timothy Mahr, Rebekah Jarvis, Ira Marcks, Chris Harvey and Sean Hovendick.

Monday, September 20 – Thursday, September 23 11am-7pm
Friday, September 24 11am-9pm
The Arts Center of the Capital Region
256 River St.
Troy, NY